Stick n String Sausage

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Stick n String Sausage

Wed, 05/12/2021 - 13:30
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Now that turkey season has ended and I’m laid up recovering from an encounter with Mister Shaky-tail, I’ve begun counting down until opening day of archery season in September.  That’s when I can take to the woods in an attempt to bring home some venison.  However, for anyone fortunate enough to have private land with a population of hogs, there’s no reason to wait on venison when fresh pork will do.  And you can be assured, I’ll be filling in the time until deer season with plenty of trips to the field for fresh sausage. 

I’ve been fortunate over the years to have been offered access to hunt places with hogs and always taking the time to share from my harvest has kept many invitations open.  But, for those of you which haven’t hogs on your property, there are other options available.  One place I simply love to hunt is located a very short drive above our county line in Inglis; the Ross Hammock Ranch.  My friend HR Ross is the owner of the ranch and inside its twelve continual miles of fencing, lies not only some of the most beautiful Florida wilderness, but also some of the finest hunting opportunities you could hope to find.  HR hosts hunts for hogs as well as other species of wildlife on his ranch and is especially adept at helping new bowhunters find success.

Once you’ve found your hunting grounds, here’s a few things to consider to get a hog on your tailgate.  Food is the reason wild hogs travel as often as they do.  The most valuable asset to your hog hunting is making sure they have a stable and plentiful food source.  Corn is one of the most successful ways to draw hogs into your hunting area.  But, if you aren’t into still hunting over feeders, you can search for rooting and other indicators of a feeding area.  

The second element that must be in place is the wind.  Hogs have an incredible sense of smell.  A hog’s nose is by far its most valuable sensory organ.  When setting up, whether in a stand, blind, or spot and stalk, make sure the wind is in your face.  It is important to take the same precautions when hunting hogs as you would a whitetail.

Hunting hogs in the south requires you to have gear that can get the job done.  I recommend a bow that you are comfortable with and can shoot with great accuracy, set to a minimum of thirty-five pounds of draw weight.  And be advised, it’s a good idea to use a heavier than normal arrow as hogs can be tough to penetrate and have small kill zones.  A hard hitting, well placed arrow is a must.

As always, if you have any feedback, suggestions or even just want to share a good hunting story, give me a shout at [email protected].  God bless and good hunting! 

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