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Two local high schools coordinate a community cleanup at Weekiwachee Preserve

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“We are hurting ourselves,” said Senior Hailey Isaksen, President for the Weeki Wachee High School National Honor Society (NHS). “In a few years, things might not be here, and we won’t realize it until it’s gone.”

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For many years, Weekiwachee Preserve has been a target for littering which has prompted cleanup events throughout the year- organized by various groups.  

On Saturday, January 12th, students of Weeki Wachee High School and Hernando High School National Honor Societies coordinated the clean-up at Weekiwachee Preserve in Spring Hill.

“It’s important to get out in the community and help out in any way that we can,” Carrie Piechowicz, Advisor for Hernando High National Honor Society, said. “Everything here is beautiful, it’s an incredible area, and it needs to be around for more generations to come.”

Every year the students from Weeki Wachee NHS organizes a community service project.

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“We’ve been doing the same one for two years now because we realized that this was a definite need in our area,”  said Susann Braden.

Susann Braden,  Weeki Wachee High School National Honor Society Advisor stated that the group also had added an educational factor where they will be visiting elementary and middle schools to bring awareness of the importance in protecting the earth’s water resources.

“I think that people don’t know the impact that the garbage has, that is why we added in this educational factor,” Braden said. “Everything ends up in the water. We need to really think about that impact because that affects not only our enjoyment of water but also the marine life.

With over fifty participants for this event, each one contributed to making Weekiwachee Preserve a more beautiful area for visitors to enjoy, as well as providing wildlife a cleaner place live.

“It’s a community outreach where we can all come together and help our environment as one,” said Hailey Isaksen.

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